• We collaborate with producers and distributors

    We collaborate with producers and distributors

  • We guarantee transparency in order to recognise quality

    We guarantee transparency in order to recognise quality

  • We comply with more restrictive sensory and chemical parameters

    We comply with more restrictive sensory and chemical parameters

  • We collaborate with the scientific community

    We collaborate with the scientific community

  • We help consumers choose discerningly

    We help consumers choose discerningly

The Italian olive oil industry is increasingly perfecting the bottling and packing stage to meet the needs of an ever-evolving consumer. The use of bottles in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) instead of glass has several advantages: lower cost, lower risk of breakage, lower weight and greater safety during transport. These aspects are particularly important for new markets rather than traditional ones where customers are accustomed to using glass bottles.

Recent research at the “Federico II” University of Naples,Department of Food Science has proved that resistance to oxidation and durability (shelf life) of oil packaged in PET is very close to that of glass containers, especially in dark storage conditions. When in the light, the length of an olive oil’s life is jeopardisedeven in clear glass in the space of a few months. In essence, for periods of 8-12 months significant differences have not been found in the storage properties of glass and PET when it comes to preserving the quality of olive oil. Where safety is concerned, the same 12-month study of the use of PET as a food-grade material suitable to contain oil, also evaluated the possible release of phthalates from plastic to oil.

This study, carried out using gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC/ MS), demonstrated that only very small amounts of phthalic esters are released into the oil (after 12 months in the light and at room temperature), much lower than those indicated in current European legislation. So in answer to the question "Extra virgin in PET?" it would appear that we can say: "Why not?"

References: A.M.Del Nobile, M.L.Ambrosino, R.Sacchi and P.Masi (2003). Design of plastic bottles for packaging of virgin olive oil. Journal of Food Science, 68 (1) 170-175.A.M.Del Nobile, S.Bove, E.LaNotte and R.Sacchi (2003). Influence of packaging geometry and material properties on the oxidation kinetic of bottled virgin olive oil, Journal of Food Engineering, 57: 189-197. A. Del Regno (2003). Degree thesis in Food Science and Technology. (Supervisor: Prof. R. Sacchi), “Federico II” University of Naples, Department of Food Science, Department of Agriculture, Portici (Naples), A. Pica, (2004). Degree thesis in Food Science and Technology. (Supervisor: Prof. R. Sacchi), “Federico II” University of Naples, Department of Food Science, Department of Agriculture, Portici (Naples).

© 2019 Consortium to Guarantee Quality Extra Virgin Olive Oil. All rights reserved.
Via Francesco Redi, 4 - 00161 Roma • P.Iva 06511371004 • e-mail:info@ceqitalia.comsegreteria@pec.ceqitalia.com

comunità europeaCampaign financed with the aid of the European Union and Italy. Reg. 867/08 and subsequent amendments